Tennessee  Trailings

Several from Grove's first
century made a difference

By STEPHANIE TAYLOE

There have been many well known men and women who went to Grove High School - doctors, lawyers and people in the arts.

Some of them have given back to the community. The following are among those who have made a difference in the lives of others.

~ Christine Reynolds, the first woman ever to hold a Tennessee cabinet post, served as Commissioner of Public Welfare during Gov. Frank Clement's first two terms, 1953-1959.

In this position, she worked for programs to help abused and underprivileged children by promoting excellent foster homes and better adoption laws.

She changed the lives of thousands of children who had no voice. She helped rewrite welfare laws, benefiting the old and mentally ill as well as children.

~ LuZane Wynns Tayloe, "friend to deaf children," is the only person to go to Grove who started her own school.

She was born in 1912 in Henry County and married John Tayloe, founder of the Tayloe Glass business in Memphis.

Their first child Sam was born deaf. In the 1930s there was limited education for the deaf; she had to send her son to St. Louis where there was specialization in teaching deaf children to read lips and speak.

She reportedly was heartbroken to leave her young son alone in St. Louis. As a result she vowed to work to help children and their mothers caught in this situation.

After a few years, the Tayloe Glass business grew to open a business in St. Louis, Chicago, Paducah, Union City, Memphis. As her fortune rose, she did not forget her promise to the deaf children and founded the Memphis School for the Deaf with a $250,000 endowment.

This enabled thousands of deaf children from Tennessee, Mississippi and Arkansas to stay at home and be educated. The school has been in operation for more than 40 years.

Heather Whitestone, 1995 Miss America and who is deaf, visited the school during her reign.

It has been said that the compassion, kindness and generosity of LuZane Wynns Tayloe has touched thousands of deaf children and their families and will continue in perpetuity as long as the school operates.

~ Mitchum Ellison Warren graduated from Grove in 1925. A Navy officer in World War II, he was president of the Mitchum Co. of Paris, which gave jobs to thousands of Henry Countians
for years.

He was one of the organizers of the World's Biggest Fish Fry celebration and was a civic leader.

He and his sister Emily Warren gave much to the community, making Paris a better place to live.

~ Lastly, let us not forget the veterans who were killed in four wars, giving their lives that we might live free.

As residents and Grove graduates come together this month to mark the 100th anniversary of the school, let us not forget the price paid by the boys from Grove who were killed.

Jim "Buddy" Dancy has a web site at www.ewgrove.com which includes most all the yearbooks from Grove. He still needs Grove yearbooks from 1922, '23, '24, '25, '26, '29, '33, '35 and"39.
He will copy them and return them to the owner unharmed. Please contact the web site for information on sending yearbooks: www.ewgrove.com
Dancy went to Grove in the early '50s.

Comments, queries, family history sheets and/or Bible. records can be sent to Tennessee Trailings, 8110 Shady Grove Road, Puryear,TN 38251.

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LINKS  TO  THE  TWO   TENNESSEE  TRAILINGS  ARTICLES  ON  GROVE'S  FIRST   CENTURY  OF  STUDENTS:
ARTICLE  I
      ARTICLE  II

 

Reprinted from the Paris Post-Intelligencer
Friday, June 9, 2006 Edition
Used  by  permission

 

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